What's The Best Lead For Pulling Dogs? - Dogs of Australia
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What’s The Best Lead For Pulling Dogs?

What’s The Best Lead For Pulling Dogs?

dog pulling on leash

On the hunt for the best lead for pulling dogs?

If you have a dog that pulls on the leash, it can be frustrating.

Personally speaking, the envy is real when it comes to seeing other dog owners who can take their pup for a casual walk with no dramas. Meanwhile mine gets so excited to see other dogs or people walking by that he starts to pull all over the place, even when there’s not a lot of room to manoeuvre.

Obviously, the solution to a dog who pulls on a leash, is to train the dog to walk on a loose leash. But life isn’t always as simple as that, and either way, you’ll still need a good leash between now and then.

Dog leashes come in different sizes and functions and there are many different types of leashes on the market today.

It can be very confusing as to which one is good for your dog, but the right leash for a dog that pulls can prevent a potentially dangerous situation from occurring.

So, in this article, we’ve compiled our favourite leashes for dogs that pull for you.

What To Look For In A Lead For Pulling Dogs

The type of leash to choose will depend on the kind of dog you have.

If you have a big dog, you want to look for a leash with a durable, ergonomic handle that isn’t too heavy. A strong handle will help you control your dog when he’s pulling. You also need high-quality stitching and strong hardware, because the last thing you want is for your clasp to open up while your dog pulls towards something.

If you have a small dog, you want a good-quality leash too, but it won’t need to withstand as much pulling force because your dog isn’t as heavy as larger breeds.

There’s no exact science to finding the best leash for every dog. What works for one dog may not work for another. But under all circumstances you should pay attention to the stitching and the hardware of your leash, so you won’t loose control of your dog when they pull.

Tactical Bungee Dog Lead For Large Pulling Dogs

Image by Excellent Elite. From $33.99 on Amazon.
  • Durable and light-weight with 100% quality warranty
  • Stretchy bungee dog leash that can give buffer time and protection on both sides when your dog rushes out
  • Metal hook clip (tested to withstand up to around 200kg) and strong reinforced box stitching
  • Soft padded handle and close-in handle that can keep your dog beside you and allowing to have more control
  • Matching tactical dog harness available from the same brand

Shock Absorbing Double Dog Lead (To Walk 2 Pulling Dogs)

Image by Zenify. From $22.95 on Amazon.
  • Shock absorbing bungee lead
  • Elastic extenders that absorb pulls from both dogs independently
  • Rotating coupler to keep two leads tangle free
  • Heavy duty clasps
  • Night reflective, chew resistant rope
  • Padded handle to prevent rope burn

Double-Ended Leash With A No Pull Harness Combination

Image by PetSafe Store. From $18.98 on Amazon.
  • Double-ended leash with two lead snaps that attach to the front and back of a no-pull harness to help redirect your dog when pulling
  • Made of nylon with reflective strips
  • Padded, free floating handle that self-adjusts to your dog’s movement
  • Swivel hardware to prevent lead entanglement

Slip rope leads, Head collar leads, and other tools to stop your dog pulling

We *strongly* recommend you seek the advice from a qualified dog trainer before you start using tools such as slip rope leads, head collar leads, and similar.

While they can be effective training tools, there are special methods of using them that you should be aware of. If not used correctly, you may end up doing more harm than good, and you can make it more difficult for yourself to use these effectively tools in the future.

Reminder: Teach your dog to walk on a loose leash as early as possible

It can be hard to try to teach an old dog new tricks, which is why it’s important to train our pups to walk on a loose leash as soon as possible.

If you get stuck with your training efforts, don’t hesitate to ask a qualified dog trainer for help.

Be aware that dog training is an unregulated industry in Australia, so if you’re not sure where to start, ask your local vet for a recommendation.

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